High School

It is our goal to empower each student to explore their unique learning styles in order to gain the ability and confidence to successfully advocate for themselves, both in the classroom and in life beyond Lawrence School.

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The Lawrence High School program is for students who have a desire to actively – and successfully – pursue their academic goals. Students are able to tackle course offerings and curricula because we build in specific, individualized teaching strategies that honor each student's unique learning style.

The high school program is anchored in discussion-based classrooms and experiential learning, and integrates the most appropriate research-based methodologies to meet the academic needs of each student.

This includes direct instruction in helping students better understand, accept, compensate and share with others about their own academic strengths and challenges.

Our Program

The personalized attention each student receives – in every classroom, from every staff member, consistently throughout his/her Lawrence School experience – is key to achieving academic and social success.

Academically, the high school program is comprehensive and comparable to what you would expect to see in other high schools (both public and private) across the area. Lawrence meets The State of Ohio curriculum guidelines, and students meet all state guidelines for grade level placement and graduation requirements.

At the high school level, Lawrence delivers a comprehensive curriculum, paced and presented in ways that encourage success and prepare students for life beyond Lawrence.

Students continue to develop note-taking, organizational, study, writing, and reading/comprehension skills within the context of each academic course.

Students have a wide choice of electives including world languages, art, music, drama, psychology, forensics, video editing, speech and debate, 3-D design and more. Independent projects, closely monitored by teachers and advisors, are assigned throughout the year. A key focus of the program is to help students clearly identify and articulate their areas of strength and success in readiness for a post-secondary environment.

Students who earn a 3.5 grade point average or higher are eligible to join the National Honor Society.

The school day is structured to facilitate student success. Classes are typically 45 minutes in length with an average of 11 students per classroom and a 3:1 boy/girl ratio.

Students benefit from built-in academic support which includes mandatory study hall sessions and frequent teacher intervention. Teachers are certified by the state per subject, and receive intensive and ongoing instruction and professional development on the Lawrence School method.

The purpose of homework

  • Assist students in building academic confidence by allowing them to experience success, while also becoming aware of their limits.
  • Facilitate the capacity for students to demonstrate a sophisticated level of metacognition-a student's ability to think about their own thinking.
  • Reinforce critical concepts taught in the classroom through independent practice.
  • Continue to build and enhance a partnership between home and school.
  • Allow the teacher to have an increased level of awareness of student strengths and weaknesses, thereby guiding personalized instruction.
  • Improve executive function skills –the ability to organize, plan and manage time.
  • Provide opportunities for students to demonstrate application of knowledge and skills in a variety of settings.

In a way that

  • Minimizes anxiety and frustration.
  • Honors individual learning styles and needs.
  • Recognizes and respects competing demands on students' time outside of school.
  • Is meaningful and purposeful.
  • Promotes exploration and discovery.
  • Meets students at the zone of proximal development (Zone of Proximal Development –or ZPD- asserts that all learning is meaningful when level of challenge is not overwhelming to a child's level of competence).
  • Recognizes attempts at completion and/or attempts to problem-solve.
  • Is strategically designed for each child.

As a result

Students should be able to effectively...

  • Apply and expand knowledge in different settings.
  • Gain a desire for continued learning and growth.
  • Transfer skills to future life experience.
  • Become more self-sufficient and accountable.
  • Own their academic and social strengths and challenges.
  • Practice self-advocacy without arrogance or apology.
  • Master effective study techniques, organizational, and time management skills.

Teachers should be able to...

  • Assess students' strengths and challenges using subjective and objective-based data.
  • Obtain a better perspective of how each student learns.
  • Adjust curriculum and methods according to students' needs.
  • Provide constructive feedback regarding student progress.

And parents should be able to...

  • Celebrate their child's strengths and accomplishments.
  • Feel empowered to taper their level of involvement based on child's developmental needs, independence, and level of ability.
  • Gain a better understanding of their child's learning style.
  • Receive consistent feedback regarding what the student is learning and how he or she is progressing toward the goal of content mastery.
Our Advisory program allows each student to meet with a smaller group of students and a teacher to work on developing strong communication skills, working cooperatively with others, maintaining high academic standards, keeping organized and ensuring that individual learning and social needs are consistently met.

During the daily Advisory period, students are encouraged to work on intrapersonal and interpersonal skills while at the same time starting to examine prevalent issues around young adulthood. Time management and organizational skills are emphasized in grades 9 and 10, while students in grades 11 and 12 begin to focus on taking more ownership of their academic career and future. Seniors in Advisory use this time to organize and work on their Senior Project – an exploration of the career field of each student’s choice along with a seven-day internship in the workplace.
Integral to learning at Lawrence is an emphasis on the importance of organization. Students are given clear and consistent direction on how to manage homework and project deadlines through advance planning and timeline creation. Each student keeps a detailed and complete Assignment Notebook where he/she is able to record future assignments, completed work, and current projects.

Tests between subjects are staggered in order to keep students on track with consistent study management skills. Students are taught to make organization a habit; thus enabling them to increase their own independence and success.
Lawrence School's comprehensive guidance program encourages students to take an active role in exploring and planning for their future. For more information, See College and Career Planning


Parents are an essential part of the learning process at Lawrence. In addition to regular parent-teacher conferences and online progress reports that reflect up-to-date grades and assignment status, parents are contacted regularly via phone or email to discuss their child's progress.

Parents are treated as team members in education, uniquely positioned to help assess our success in making true, substantive changes in their children's lives.

Additionally, because Lawrence parents all share a unique experience we have in place a very thoughtful and active Parents Pride organization.

Also, under the Parents Pride organization, parents have the ability to help plan and host family social events, organize parent-education opportunities, and assist with the annual Benefit Auction.

Students are issued a Grade Point Average (GPA) each semester, based on a 4.00 scale with honors courses weighted by .5 point for grades of C and above. Lawrence School does not report class rank, but does determine valedictorian status in senior year. Students who earn a 3.0 GPA or above are placed on the Merit Roll. Students who earn a 3.5 GPA or above are placed on the Honor Roll.

Defying The Odds

Since 2005, 86 percent of Lawrence School students have matriculated to a 2 or 4-year college or university, compared to the national average of just 67 percent for students with LD. The disparity is even greater when comparing the matriculation to a four-year institution with 68 percent of Lawrence students attending a 4-year institution, compared to the national standard of 21.

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